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The Origins of Earth Day Features 

The Origins of Earth Day

The first Earth Day took place on April 22nd, 1970, in the United States, and involved peaceful protests across the country advocating for a healthier and more sustainable environment. Mainstream America was largely unaware of the detriment the environment was facing due to the burning of fossil fuels, air pollution and resource overexploitation. A best selling book by Rachel Carson released in 1962 titled “Silent Spring” was a key component in the raising of public awareness concerning the environment, pollution and their relation to public health. Americans had lots of…

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It’s Not a Myth Voices 

It’s Not a Myth

Who’s exhausted from hearing the constant talk about climate change? Apparently we’re all completely ignorant and the environmentalists are standing alone in their quest to slow the rate of pollution. But come on, right? Many of us say that we care about the issue and most of us claim that we are conscious about our ecological footprint and make attempts to reduce it. Maybe tree huggers just have a passion for concocting controversial posters, researching the main causes of the greenhouse gas emissions and blocking traffic flow on streets with…

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Canada is Warming Faster as Governments Fail to Catch Up Features 

Canada is Warming Faster as Governments Fail to Catch Up

Canada is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world, according to a recent report prepared by government scientists. In parts of Canada’s north, this warming is progressing at thrice the rate of the global average. While, since 1948, other countries have increased temperatures by roughly 0.8 degrees, Canada has been touched by a 1.7 degree increase. As the report notes in its headline statements, “this warming is effectively irreversible,” and “further warming,” it anticipates, “is unavoidable.” These changes to our temperature can be expected to increase freshwater…

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Climate Change In Canada Features 

Climate Change In Canada

Canada’s biggest industries involve the extraction of natural resources, including oil, gas and uranium. With the Arctic warming faster than any other biome recently due to increased greenhouse gas emissions, Canadians are particularly concerned about the impacts of climate change. The country generates enormous wealth from its oil and gas operations. However, the oil and gas industries account for a quarter of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions, with the oilsands being the most carbon intensive. The oil extracted in Alberta’s oilsands reserves is shipped in pipelines in its raw form. The…

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Nothing’s Sweeter Than Picket Signs: the March of March 15th News 

Nothing’s Sweeter Than Picket Signs: the March of March 15th

My brother and I didn’t prepare any poster or costume or poetry for Montreal’s last big climate strike. We just got off at Place-Des-Arts and listened to speeches in a December cold and shouted our voices dry with 50,000 other voices. We strode to Mount Royal. Protestors were beating the drum, dancing and shouting their way up to the mountain. Women yelled praises out their house windows, clapping their pots and pans with wooden spoons to us down in the street. It was a real gay delight and the peoples…

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Venezuela and North America: New Paths Towards Destruction News 

Venezuela and North America: New Paths Towards Destruction

Some time ago, in an address to the UN General Assembly, Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez warned of the “destructive capacity” of rising oil usage. The “unstoppable” use of this resource meant hotter temperatures and harsher natural disasters. Chavez was the leader of a country sitting on the world’s greatest oil-reserves, larger than Saudi Arabia’s, larger than Iran’s. This was 2005. Now, in 2019, oil production may soon be rising in Venezuela, despite old hopes for ecological alternatives. It’s been a matter of weeks since Juan Guaido, the head of Venezuela’s…

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Saving the Bees: What’s All the Buzz About? Features 

Saving the Bees: What’s All the Buzz About?

A common childhood fear is that of bees, and, like most things stemming from youth, said fear often follows into adult life. Therefore, the recently popularized phrase, “save the bees”, may spur up confusion with many asking why it is so important to protect such seemingly menacing creatures. However, we do not give bees credit for all of the work that they do in everyday life. Bees are known to be the world’s most efficient and effective pollinators. While travelling from plant to plant in search of nectar, they carry…

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No Pipelines, but no Progress Either News 

No Pipelines, but no Progress Either

Quebec is falling behind on its desired targets for reducing CO2 emissions, a recent article in Le Devoir highlights. Despite some $2 billion in funding, the ministry of sustainable government has only been able to bring down emissions to 98% of what it was 5 years ago. That is to say, there has been a 2% reduction. This 2% represents roughly 1.8 million tons of CO2. The Port-Daniel cement manufacturing plant in Gaspésie emits this many tons alone. The Legault administration has already admitted that by 2020 we will not…

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Food Waste Features 

Food Waste

It is not at all uncommon to see a perfectly wrapped and uneaten sandwich, or a half eaten container of takeout in the garbage bin. Sadly, discarded food is a sight seen far too often. According to a recent study, Canada is one of the worst offenders. Research conducted over the past year by public and industry leaders in food waste Second Harvest and Value Chain International found that Canadians have wasted or lost nearly 60 percent of the food they produced, which equates to 35.5 million metric tonnes of…

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Radical Biographies: Murray Bookchin and the Anarchist’s Nature Features 

Radical Biographies: Murray Bookchin and the Anarchist’s Nature

Murray Bookchin would have been a gadfly had he not trilled the notes of beauty and imagination. The philosopher was raised in a different society. Political discussion was public discussion, frequently done at the feet of the local candy store. If the weather was nice, one could go hear the daily preachings of radicals at street corners. There was hope for revolution in this 1930s Working Class New York City village. These conditions inspired a philosophy that places a great value on the experience of freedom and equality. Bookchin’s own…

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